CHARITIES

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All funds raised will be split equally between our charities, the money raised on this page will go directly to our charities. We have been very fortunate to have an exclusive race sponsor fund our race budget, for which we are blown away by there generosity and it enables us to focus on our training and raising valuable funds for our chosen charities.

OUR VISION

“A MENTALLY RESILIENT AND PROSPEROUS ARMED FORCES COMMUNITY.”

OUR MISSION

“TO EMPOWER SERVICEMEMBERS AND VETERANS TO DEVELOP AND SUSTAIN A POSITIVE MINDSET.”

By building a fully equipped and catered retreat in a natural and relaxed setting we will help people to build the daily habits that will increase their mental resilience, and generate a positive mindset to cope with life’s challenges.

We aim to initially take groups of 8 service members and veterans through a 7-day residential course in basic yet in-depth positive mindset training; ranging from night and morning routines, tailored nutrition, fitness, different types of meditation, emotional intelligence awareness, developing their social interactions, affirmations, journaling and much more.

Paul Minter, veteran and founder of HeadUp is planning on running 5,800 miles around the UK in 200 days in 2022, to help raise funds for the retreat.

Marduk team members Adam and George, as trustees of HeadUp, want to build on Paul’s success by taking part in the Talisker Whisky Atlantic Challenge – demonstrating the power of mental resilience, and raising further funds to support those in need.

By June 2023, HeadUp will be operating its fully equipped and catered retreat in a natural and relaxed setting. We will be helping people to build the daily habits that will increase their mental resilience, and generate a positive mindset to cope with life’s challenges. Our intent for 2023/24 is to expand our remit to help others outside of the military sphere – recognising that poor mental health effects all of us.

We believe there is a huge need for what we can offer:

  • Our environment is completely removed from the military: For serving or ex-members of the forces, being surrounded by people in uniform and the regimented life of the forces can trigger harmful mental states. By removing our guests from the military environment, we can create the space for them to switch off.

  • Our offering is proactive and reactive: As well as those that are suffering from severe mental health issues, we also want to receive guests who have recognised that their mental health is deteriorating before they need psychiatric attention. We believe that simple lifestyle changes can generate huge improvements in people’s general mental wellbeing, potentially stopping their situation from getting worse.

  • Our guests don’t need a pre-existing condition: There is no criteria for attending one of our residential courses, we are open to everyone – this means we can help more people and relieve the pressure on other charities that are inundated with requests for help.

We will not be giving any psychiatric or professional advice and are not looking to replace or discourage therapy or medication.
We want to teach these different methods and techniques so that they can be implemented by our guests when they return to their daily lives, feeling happier, in control and in a healthier mental state.

Where will the money be used?

We are hoping to generate £250,000 in donations, via both direct donations and as a vehicle to increase HeadUp’s media exposure.

This will allow us to support 200 guests through 24 courses at our retreat – covering the full operating costs for 1 year.

 

Who is going to benefit from it?

Our growth strategy for 2023/4 includes developing the facilities on-site at our retreat and also expanding our remit to help people outside of the military sphere, such as frontline emergency services. In addition we want to work with businesses so that their employees can benefit from our programs – recognising that workplace stress is a growing issue for many organisations.

 

What impact will the money have?

Ultimately, we firmly believe that this money will save lives, relieve pressure on the mental health system and help to highlight the growing mental health epidemic in the UK.

We would like to have you onboard this journey with us, and encourage all of our corporate donors to visit our retreat to see the benefit our services provide first-hand.

A NUMBER OF THE TEAM MARDUK TEAM MEMBERS HAVE LOST LOVED FAMILY MEMBERS DUE TO BOWEL CANCER - A DISEASE THAT IS NOT TALKED ABOUT AS FREQUENTLY OR AS OPENLY AS OTHER CANCERS, DESPITE BEING THE COUNTRY’S SECOND BIGGEST CANCER KILLER. BOWEL CANCER IS A DISEASE THAT IS TAKING THE LIVES OF A GROWING NUMBER OF YOUNGER PEOPLE, DESPITE THE FACT THAT WITH EARLY DIAGNOSIS IT IS VERY TREATABLE.

Every year over 2,500 people under the age of 50 are diagnosed with bowel cancer in the UK. While this accounts for only six percent of those diagnosed with the disease, the number is increasing. The size of this group of patients is comparable with the number of people of all ages diagnosed with different cancer types, such as cervical cancer (3,192) and testicular cancer (2,364). Despite this, awareness that this is a disease that younger people can be diagnosed with is low amongst the general public and healthcare professionals.

As a result, people under 50 can find it harder to get a diagnosis through referral by their GP, with one in four being diagnosed as an emergency, compared to one in seven in over 50s. Delays in being referred for crucial and potentially lifesaving tests lead to younger people being diagnosed at a later stage when their chance of survival is worse. One in four bowel cancer patients under 50 are diagnosed at the latest stage in comparison to one in five in those over 50.

Our Never Too Young campaign

Our Never Too Young campaign was launched in 2013 after we increasingly heard from younger bowel cancer patients that they were being diagnosed late, having been told they were too young to have the disease. They also told us of their frustration about the lack of support they received when dealing with the effects of bowel cancer and its treatment. Our Never Too Young campaign is leading the change for younger bowel cancer patients.

We are:

• Raising awareness amongst the public and clinical community

• Campaigning for the identification of those at high risk of developing bowel cancer at a younger age. This includes people with Lynch syndrome, a condition which increases the risk of bowel cancer to up to 80%

• Influencing policy changes to improve the early diagnosis of younger people with bowel cancer

• Meeting the information and support needs of this frequently overlooked group

In 2015 we surveyed younger bowel cancer patients. The results revealed a shocking picture of delays in diagnosis and a lack of support and care for younger people with bowel cancer. Since then, we’ve achieved a number of successes.

What are we calling for?

  • Improved awareness in the general public and for medical professionals on the symptoms of bowel cancer, and that it can affect people under the age of 50

  • Younger people going to their GP with symptoms of bowel cancer should be referred for further tests without unnecessary delays

  • Younger patients with bowel cancer should have treatment, care and support tailored to their needs

  • All younger bowel cancer patients should be tested for Lynch syndrome as soon as they are diagnosed and receive the appropriate surveillance colonoscopies

  • Challenges in the healthcare system amplified by COVID-19, such as endoscopy capacity, must be addressed urgently to prevent further barriers to diagnosis for younger people.